Management Tips

Nutrition

Facility Focus: Summer Silage Storage and Bunk Management

The sticker shock of feed prices have been a sucker punch for dairy farmers over the last year, and there doesn’t seem to be much relief in sight. Elevated feed costs have forced some producers to grow more of their own forages this season, including corn silage. While prioritizing growing quality forage is a must, proper feed ingredient storage is equally important, especially during the hot summer months.

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Nobis Agri Science Summer Heat Tips

The primary reason cows decrease milk production during hot weather is that the cows eat less. Since cows will be consuming less as temperatures increase, increasing the energy density of the diet can in part compensate for the decrease in dry matter intake.

We at Nobis Agri Science (NAS) have a strategy to have “HEAT STRESS” rations ready to implement when the HIGH HEAT INDEXES strike your dairy. Ask your nutritionist to prepare you for the heat with the proper ration.

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Variation Can Unlock Profit Potential

The term variation has been deemed a negative in our dairy nutrition tribal language. We need to change our language and understanding of this term. “Variation is an opportunity!”

Variation is attributable to different things, with some being really important to cash flow. The economically meaningful variation comes to light when enough data is collected and trends or impact factors are identified. This variation then becomes something that we can manage to our benefit.

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First Cutting: Resources for success in 2022

First cutting of a perennial hay crop offers the opportunity to capture high quantity and quality, but timely harvest can be met with a number of obstacles. This fact sheet provides links to several current resources to aid in successful decision making for the upcoming season.

How to Feed Your Dairy Herd Under Extreme Volatility

Volatility: friend or foe?

From labor, to equipment, to dairy supplies, to feed availability, and even prices — volatility is a new normal for us to manage in our dairy businesses. Some have cast volatility in a negative light. However, with change comes opportunity! Remain steadfast in seeking the positive with the undeniably changing dairy business landscape ahead. Despite volatility and changes, there are exciting times ahead for our dairy industry. Consumers throughout the world continue to demand more nutritious dairy protein and butterfat, and our industry is poised to deliver!

Mitigating Heat Stress in Dry Cows

Warmer weather is on the horizon, and the increase in environmental temperature seriously impacts animal productivity.

Evaluating Feed Efficiency For Your Dairy's Profitability

There are two ways producers can manage feed efficiency. The first is to increase milk production at the same rate of feed. The other is to decrease feed intake and keep milk production at the same level. However, it’s important for producers to understand: While feed efficiency is an important metric to measure and monitor regularly, profitability should also be considered. High feed efficiency does not always equal high profitability. If you’re spending more on feed to increase milk production, you may not see profit.

Using a Feed Additive Audit to Control Feed Costs

When starting the audit, take each ingredient and look at it through a magnifying glass. Be careful not to forget that many feed additives have become key to maintaining profitability on the dairy, so these audits are not just about lowering costs. Auditing a ration is more about ensuring a balance between price and performance. Here is the step-by-step audit process.

Facility Focus: Back to the Curtain Management Basics

We’ve reached the time of year when weather conditions once again become cool and damp, causing dairy producers to run toward their facility’s curtains and close buildings up tight. While it might be tempting to batten down the hatches to keep cold air from coming in, lowering ventilation and reducing air exchange is one of the worst things a farmer can do for their animals.

Winterizing Calves

The cooler days and nights are here, and a good reminder of taking steps to winterize the things in our lives: vehicles, homes, and wardrobes. Winterizing is a proactive solution that helps us avoid problems associated with dropping temperatures and is a tactic that can also be applied to your calves.

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620 Gray Street
P.O. Box 394
Plainwell, MI 49080